Set up your assets and devices and begin acquiring data.

Before you begin, connect your devices to a power source.

  1. Downloading InsightCM Software—Download the InsightCM software to your computer.

  2. Upgrading to InsightCM 3.8.5—Install the InsightCM software to your computer.

  3. Set up Equipment Assets—Configure your asset tree with general and equipment assets that accurately represent and organize the equipment you want to monitor.

  4. Add Sensors to Equipment—Assign sensor assets to each equipment asset to represent the sensors collecting data from each equipment and to enable features and trend alarm rules.

  5. Add a device to InsightCM.

    Add a Continuous Device to InsightCM

    Map a monitoring device that is powered and collects data via wired connection to InsightCM.

    Add a Wireless Device to InsightCM

    Map a monitoring device that collects data wirelessly to InsightCM.

    Add a Thermal Imaging Device to InsightCM

    Map a monitoring device that collects thermal data via ethernet-wired connection to InsightCM.

  6. Acquire data from devices.

    Acquire Data with Continuous Devices

    Begin acquiring data from your hardwired devices.

    Acquire Data with Wireless Devices

    Begin acquiring data from your wireless devices.

    Note

    Both data acquisition methods apply to thermal imaging devices.

Upgrading to InsightCM 3.8.5

Before upgrading to InsightCM 3.8.5, your server must be running InsightCM 3.6 or later. See InsightCM Upgrade Process for the upgrading process.

Note

InsightCM and SystemLink are incompatible and should not be installed on the same server.

  1. Backup your server by stopping the NI InsightCM 3.X and NI InsightCM MongoDB services and copying “C:\ProgramData\National Instruments\InsightCM 3.0” to a safe location. If InsightCM is configured to use non-default Database and Data File directories, backup those directories too.

  2. Run the installer. See the instructions under Installing InsightCM 3.8.5.

  3. Open a web browser and navigate to http://localhost:82/icm or https://localhost:482/icm to confirm that the upgrade was successful. Clear the cache on your web browser to prevent the browser from being redirected to the previous version of InsightCM's web application. Refer to browser-specific documentation to clear the cache.

  4. Browse to the Assets page and confirm that the Asset tree was imported correctly.

  5. Browse to the Device page and confirm that the device channels are mapped to the Asset tree correctly.

  6. Update Condition Monitoring devices applications and connect to the InsightCM Server:

    • Browse to the Software tab on the Devices page.

    • Select a group of ten devices that you want to update and select Update Application. Check the configuration status of the device to see when the update finishes and the devices' Deployment Status will display Succeeded once complete.

    • Repeat this process for the next group of ten devices until all devices are updated.

      Note

      Custom units may not be imported and must be re-added manually after upgrading.

Installing InsightCM 3.8.5

  1. Double click the installer ISO to mount it.

  2. Run InsightCM.exe.

  3. Proceed through the installation dialog until you reach the Data page. If desired, specify custom directories for the Database Folder and Data Folder. If upgrading from a previous version of InsightCM, ensure that the installer properly detected the correct directories.

  4. Proceed to the Summary page and select Install.

  5. A server reboot might be required during installation. If prompted, select Restart and wait for the server to reboot. Sign back into the same user account you were using previously and the installation will proceed automatically.

  6. After the installation is completed, select Launch InsightCM and confirm the web UI successfully launches.

InsightCM Data Directories

InsightCM stores data in both a central database and as files on disk. By default, data is automatically moved from the Database to the Data directory after 30 days. This archiving process results in better performance by decreasing memory used by the InsightCM database and more uniform load time for viewing data in the Data Viewer. The archived data can still be accessed in the Data Viewer. By default, the following directories are used:

  • Database Directory: C:\ProgramData\Cutsforth\InsightCM\MongoDB

  • Data Directory: C:\ProgramData\Cutsforth\InsightCM\Files

For optimal performance, Cutsforth recommends using separate SSDs for each data directory. Custom directory locations can be specified when installing InsightCM.

Changing the Data Directory

  1. Open Windows Command Prompt and run the following commands:

    • cd “C:\Program Files\Cutsforth\InsightCM\”

    • InsightCMConsole setdatadir -dir "<desired-data-directory-location>"

  2.     Restart the InsightCM service.

Licensing InsightCM Server

Online Activations

If the server is connected to the internet, you can use online activation to license the server.

  1. Open the web UI and navigate to Navigation Menu > Licensing.

  2. Enter your License ID, Activation Code, and an Installation Name you can use to identify the server.

  3. Select the Enable online activation checkbox.

  4. Select Activate.

Offline Activations

If the server is not connected to the internet, you must use offline activation to license the server.

  1. Open the web UI and navigate to Navigation Menu > Licensing.

  2. Enter your License ID, Activation Code, and an Installation Name you can use to identify the server.

  3. Select Activate.

  4. To validate the license, the server will download a .zip file containing a license request. Transfer the file to a computer with internet access, unzip it, and double-click it to open it in a web browser.

  5. Select the Download button to download the response. See the figure below.

    License_Portal.jpg
  6. Transfer the file to the offline InsightCM server.

  7. Select Upload and upload the license file.

Now that you have InsightCM installed on your server, you are now ready to begin setting up equipment assets in software.

Configuring Your Asset Tree

Map your condition-monitoring system on InsightCM using location, equipment, and sensor assets.

  1. Organize your assets–Use location assets as an organizational element before adding equipment and sensors.

  2. Add equipment assets–Define the equipment assets in your condition monitoring system on the Asset Configuration page.

  3. Add sensor assets to equipment–Configure sensor assets for the equipment you are monitoring.

  4. Add a smart motor pump–Configure equipment on the asset configuration page to populate analysis and alerts in the Reliability dashboard based on your equipment data.

  5. Validate your assets–Verify that you have configured your assets correctly.

  6. Add notes and instructions–Add notes and instructions about an asset if multiple people are monitoring it.

Refer to Adding Cutsforth Monitoring Devices to configure your monitoring device and/or data source(s) and create data groups.

Organizing Your Assets

Use location assets as an organizational element before adding equipment and sensors.

Before you begin, determine how you will organize your assets on the Asset Configuration page. For example, you can group assets based on location, the technology you use to monitor your assets, or the structure of a computerized maintenance management system (CMMS).

Add location assets at any level of your asset tree to keep your assets organized.

Note

Add location assets as child assets for additional levels of organization.

  1. Click Configuration (noloc_env_config.png) and select Assets.

  2. Above the left-hand asset tree, click Add.

  3. Expand General and select Location.

  4. Give the location asset a descriptive name and specify how many location assets with this name to add.

  5. Click OK.

  6. Repeat steps 1-5 as needed.

Now begin adding equipment assets.

Adding Equipment Assets

Define the equipment assets in your condition monitoring system on the Asset Configuration page.

Now that you have set up the organization of your asset tree using location assets, begin adding equipment assets, assets that represent your equipment.

  1. Click Configuration (noloc_env_config.png) and select Assets.

  2. Select a location asset and click Add.

    Note

    The equipment options in the dialog box correspond to toolkits you purchased with your InsightCM system.

  3. In the resulting dialog box, expand Equipment and select an equipment type from the list.

    Note

    Refer to the List of Equipment Asset Types to see configuration requirements for each equipment asset type.

  4. Give the equipment asset a descriptive name and specify the number assets you want to add to your asset tree.

  5. Click OK.

Now that you have added your equipment, add sensor assets and configure data collection behavior using each asset's configuration tabs.

equipment assets

Adding Sensor Assets

Configure sensor assets for the equipment you are monitoring.

Before you begin, add equipment assets to the Asset Configuration page.

  1. Click Configuration (noloc_env_config.png).

  2. Select an equipment asset that needs sensors.

  3. Click Add and expand the Sensors section.

    Note

    For wireless condition-monitoring systems using MON-10411(s), consider using the Wireless Sensor Equipment template. The template automatically populates the correct number of sensors on the asset tree to represent a single MON-10411.

  4. Expand the type of device that will monitor your asset and select a sensor.

  5. Enter a descriptive name for the sensor asset in the Name text field.

  6. Specify how many of this asset to add and click OK.

  7. Repeat steps 2–6 to define additional sensors until you have defined all sensors.

    Note

    To configure wireless data collection settings, refer to Configuring Data Collection for Wireless Equipment.

    You have finished constructing your asset tree.

You are ready to add a monitoring device and to map device channels to the sensors you just added.

Validating Your Assets

Verify that you have configured your assets correctly.

  1. Click the Configuration button (noloc_env_config.png) to navigate to the Asset Confirmation page.

  2. Select the asset(s) you want to validate.

  3. Click Validate. InsightCM displays validation errors if there are any.

    There are no validation errors

    A notification saying there are no errors appears. No further action required.

    There are validation errors

    The Validation Results dialog box appears with a list of validation errors. Take note of the errors, click OK , fix the errors, and re-validate until there are no validation errors.

    Note

    InsightCM indicates a valid configuration when the red dot/outline disappears. If still invalid, click Validate to identify why your configuration is invalid.

Adding Notes and Instructions About an Asset

Add notes and instructions about an asset if multiple people are monitoring it.

  1. Click Configuration (noloc_env_config.png) and navigate to the Asset Configuration page.

  2. Select an asset and click the Description tab in the right-hand asset configuration panel.

  3. Click the Add button in the Comments toolbar to add a note or specific instruction about the selected asset.

    Note

    You cannot edit comments once you add them.

  4. Click the Add button in the Attachments toolbar to add an attachment relevant to the selected asset.

  5. You can add standard notes and attachments to all existing and future assets of a specific type by modifying the Comments and Attachments section in the Description configuration tab on the Asset Definitions page.

    Note

    Attachments cannot exceed 10 megabytes.

    asset description and attachments.png

List of Features

An important part of the configuration for an asset is the lists of features that InsightCM calculates each time the asset collects data. You can review and configure the list for a given asset on the Features tab of the Asset Configuration page.

Note

You cannot edit pre-configured features - only features that you add to an asset or an asset type.

Feature Name

Type

Description

Active Power

MCSA

Total input active power, in watts or kilowatts, of the motor

Apparent Power

MCSA

Total input apparent power, in volt-amperes or kilovolt-amperes, of the motor

Average Temperature

Thermal Imaging

The average temperature across an ROI

Crest Factor*

Vibration

Crest Factor equation.png

Delta Temperature

Thermal Imaging

The difference between the maximum temperatures of two or more ROIs

Derating Factor

MCSA

The value to derate the motor output based on the calculated motor voltage unbalance in compliance with NEMA MG 1-2014

Derived Peak*

Vibration

Derived Peak equation.png

Effective Service Factor

MCSA

loc_eq_effective_service_factor.png

Efficiency

MCSA

Motor efficiency in percentage

Envelope Total Power

Vibration

The total energy in the envelope spectrum.

Gap

Vibration

The DC value of the signal

Kurtosis

Vibration

kurtosis_feature.png

Where (Kurtosis_variable_1.png) is the fourth central moment and (Kurtosis_variable_2.png) is the standard deviation.

Line Frequency

MCSA

Line frequency, in Hz, of the voltage bus

Load

MCSA

Output load, in kilowatts or horsepower, of the motor

Maximum Temperature

Thermal Imaging

The highest temperature across an ROI

MCSA RMS

MCSA

The RMS values of voltage or current waveforms in volts or amperes

MCSA Speed

MCSA

Motor rotational speed in revolutions per minute (RPM)

Minimum Temperature

Thermal Imaging

The lowest temperature across an ROI

Peak-Peak*

Vibration

The greatest positive peak minus the least negative peak

Percent Full Load Amps

MCSA

Maximum RMS for motor startup currents each cycle in percentage of the full load amperes on the motor nameplate

Percent Load

MCSA

Motor load, in percentage of the full load on the motor nameplate

Phasor: Magnitude

MCSA

Magnitude of the fundamental phasor, in volts or amperes, of voltage or current waveforms

Phasor: Phase

MCSA

Phase of the fundamental phasor, in degrees, of voltage or current waveforms

Power Factor

MCSA

Power factor of the motor

Reactive Power

MCSA

Total input reactive power, in volt-ampere reactives or kilovolt-ampere reactives, of the motor

RMS*

Vibration

The root mean square of the signal

Rotor Bar Sideband

MCSA

Maximum magnitude, in decibels, of rotor bar sideband harmonics. The decibel reference is the fundamental component magnitude in the spectrum

Smax

Vibration

The maximum value of shaft vibration in two dimensions. This feature is available only for displacement sensors that are part of a pair of orthogonal probes. InsightCM Server also requires that each sensor in a pair have the following properties configured on the Properties tab of the Asset Configuration page. Otherwise, InsightCM Server logs an error value (-1, by default).

  • The Pair Sensor field must specify the name of the other sensor.

  • The Unit field for each sensor must match.

Smax is the result of the following equation, which complies with the ISO 79194:1996(E) standard.

loc_eq_smax.gif

where S1 is the instantaneous value of the shaft displacement

SA1 is the time-dependent measurement from one sensor in the pair

SB1 is the time-dependent measurement from the other sensor

Startup Peak Amps

MCSA

Maximum instantaneous peak value, in amperes, of startup motor currents

Startup Time

MCSA

Time duration, in seconds, for the motor to remain in startup state

Temperature

Vibration

N/A

Torque

MCSA

Output torque, in Newton meters or pound-foot, of the motor

Torque Ripple

MCSA

loc_eq_torque_ripple.png

Total Power in Band

EMSA

The spectral energy in all frequency ranges

Note

Use the Remove Spurs property for this feature to ensure that feature calculations do not include spikes.

True Peak

Vibration

The absolute value of the greatest positive peak or the least negative peak, whichever is greater

Unbalance

MCSA

Unbalance, in percentage, of three-phase voltage buses or three-phase motor currents in compliance with NEMA MG 1-2014

*The data is AC-coupled for the purpose of calculating this feature. If a sensor is configured as DC-coupled, the InsightCM Server AC couples its data for the purpose of calculating these features.

Spectral Bands

Name

Toolkit Required

Additional Explanation

1x Magnitude

Vibration

The sum of the spectrum bins from 0.8x to 1.2x the speed.

2x Magnitude

Vibration

The sum of the spectrum bins from 1.8x to 2.2x the speed.

1x Phase

Vibration

The phase of the 1x component of the signal.

2x Phase

Vibration

The phase of the 2x component of the signal.

Asynchronous

Vibration

The spectral energy that is above 1x running speed and is not synchronous.

EMSA Spectral Band

EMSA

The spectral energy between start and stop frequencies.

Note

Use the Remove Spurs property for this feature to ensure that feature calculations do not include spikes.

Envelope Spectral Band

Vibration

The sum of energy from the envelope spectrum.

High Frequency

Vibration

The sum of the spectrum bins from 1000 Hz to the maximum frequency value.

Non-synchronous

Vibration

The spectral energy that is not at integer multiples of running speed but is above 1x running speed.

Order Domain Spectral Band

Vibration

The sum of energy from the order spectrum.

Subsynchronous

Vibration

The sum of the spectrum bins from 0.2x to 0.8x the speed.

Synchronous

Vibration

The spectral energy at integer multiples of running speed.

Residual

Vibration

A measure of the energy left in a signal after you remove the energy from all other spectral bands calculated for the sensor. Residual spectral bands apply to a specific domain only, so the InsightCM web application requires you to choose the domain. For example, consider that you assign the acceleration Residual band to a sensor. The value of the band is the energy left after removing the energy from other spectral bands in the acceleration domain only. Therefore, if single integration is enabled, the acceleration Residual band factors in energy removed from a 1x Magnitude spectral band whose units are g rms, but not from a 1x Magnitude spectral band in the velocity domain whose units are ips rms.

Note

  • You can add one Residual spectral band for each domain to a sensor.

  • Any phase spectral bands are not part of calculating the Residual spectral band.

  • If a sensor contains spectral bands that overlap, the algorithm removes the energy from the overlapping region only once. Therefore, the value of residual spectral bands is always greater than or equal to zero.

  • The residual calculation accounts for the subsynchronous spectral band.

User-Defined

Vibration

The sum of energy from a spectrum where the bands are defined by the user.

Examples of Residual Spectral Band Values

Energy in Signal

Other Spectral Bands

Residual Value

At 1x, 2x, and 3x the running speed

1x Magnitude

All the energy from the 2x and 3x components of the signal.

At 1x, 2x, and 3x the running speed

  • 1x Magnitude

  • 2x Magnitude

The energy from the 3x component of the signal.

At 1x, 2x, and 3x the running speed

  • 1x Magnitude

  • 2x Magnitude

  • A custom spectral band for 3x magnitude

Zero

At 1x, 2x, and 3x the running speed

A custom spectral band from 0.8 to 3.2 orders

Zero

At 1x, 2x, and 3x the running speed of 60 Hz

A custom spectral band from 50 Hz to 70 Hz

All the energy from the 2x and 3x components of the signal

List of Asset Properties

On the Asset Configuration page, the Properties tab in an asset's configuration panel contains a subset of these properties. The properties available for a particular asset vary based on the property definition of that asset type.

Property

Required Toolkit

Description

Additional Information

1x Magnitude Reference

None

The 1x magnitude value when the shaft is at slow-roll speed

On the Data Viewer page, Bode and Polar viewers subtract this slow-roll value from channel data so that the plots start at 0.

1x Phase Reference

None

The 1x phase value when the shaft is at slow-roll speed

On the Data Viewer page, Bode and Polar viewers subtract this slow-roll value from channel data so that the plots start at 0.

B

Bandwidth (Hz)

EMSA

The amount of data to acquire around a center frequency

N/A

Bearing Clearance Unit

None

The units in which the Horizontal Bearing Clearance and Vertical Bearing Clearance properties express the maximum possible orbit of the shaft centerpoint inside the bearing

N/A

Bearing Start Position

None

The location of the shaft within its bearing housing when at rest, whether at the top, middle, or bottom of the housing

N/A

C

Calibration Factor

MCSA

The gain factor applied to the voltage or current sensor data

N/A

Coefficient K

CMS

Calculated using the Winter-Kennedy Method Relative Flow Measurement

Coupling

None

AC or DC

N/A

Current Phase A

MCSA

The current transformer asset node corresponding to phase A of the motor current channels

When only two of the three current phase channels are configured in the Group Properties section of the Properties tab, InsightCM calculates the data of the third current phase channel.

Current Phase B

MCSA

The current transformer asset node corresponding to phase B of the motor current channels

When only two of the three current phase channels are configured in the Group Properties section of the Properties tab, InsightCM calculates the data of the third current phase channel.

Current Phase C

MCSA

The current transformer asset node corresponding to phase C of the motor current channels

When only two of the three current phase channels are configured in the Group Properties section of the Properties tab, InsightCM calculates the data of the third current phase channel.

Custom Coefficients A

None

The A constant of the Callendar-Van Dusen equation

Enter a value for this property when you specify Custom for the RTD Type property.

Custom Coefficients B

None

The B constant of the Callendar-Van Dusen equation

Enter a value for this property when you specify Custom for the RTD Type property.

Custom Coefficients C

None

The C constant of the Callendar-Van Dusen equation

Enter a value for this property when you specify Custom for the RTD Type property.

D

Detection Mode

EMSA

Determines how amplitude is detected:

  • Average

  • Peak

  • Quasi-Peak

N/A

Detection Time (seconds)

EMSA

The time, in seconds, that a sensor takes to acquire amplitude at a point

N/A

Digital Threshold

None

Specifies what voltage values indicate that the channel is on or off

For example, if you set the digital threshold to 2, values greater than or equal to 2 indicate that the channel is on while values below 2 indicate that the channel is off. The range of valid threshold values is 0-60. This property is only available on the 9219 module.

Double Integration Cutoff

None

The frequency, in Hz, at which to set the highpass filter when performing double integration on asset data

N/A

E

Efficiency @ 75% Load (%)

MCSA

The motor efficiency as a percentage when the load is three quarters of the full load

N/A

Efficiency @ 50% Load (%)

MCSA

The motor efficiency as a percentage when the load is half of the full load.

N/A

Efficiency @ 25% Load (%)

MCSA

The motor efficiency as a percentage when the load is a quarter of the full load

N/A

Estimate Stator Resistance

MCSA

Whether the motor stator resistance value is manually specified by the user or estimated by the InsightCM Server

InsightCM Server estimates the motor stator resistance based on the motor nameplate parameters. If the motor nameplate information is not appropriately specified, the accuracy of the estimation may be affected, which then affects the accuracy of the motor Torque Ripple and Torque Waveform calculation. The following motor nameplate parameters will affect the stator resistance estimation: Synchronous Speed (RPM), Full Load Speed (RPM), Load, Full Load Efficiency (%), and Full Load Amps (amp).

F

Full Load Amps (amp)

MCSA

Specify the motor full load current in amperes according to the motor nameplate

N/A

Full Load Efficiency (%)

MCSA

The motor full load efficiency as a percentage according to the motor nameplate

N/A

Full Load Speed (RPM)

MCSA

The motor full load speed in rotations per minute according to the motor nameplate

N/A

Full Scale Voltage

EMSA

The largest voltage range you expect the HFCT to detect

N/A

G

Gap Voltage Reference

None

The DC value, in volts, of the displacement probe when the shaft is at rest

The Data Viewer page subtracts this value from the DC voltages measured during normal operation and combines the results to generate accurate plots in the Shaft Centerline viewer.

H

Horizontal Bearing Clearance

None

The horizontal diameter of the maximum bearing clearance, expressed in the units the Bearing Clearance Unit property specifies

The Data Viewer page uses this value to display the maximum bearing clearance line in orbit and Shaft Centerline viewers.

I

Input Range

None

The input range of the module to which the channel belongs in the same pre-scaled units in which the module acquires data

You can find this value in the module [Operating Instructions and Specifications] document.

IEPE

None

Specifies to power IEPE sensors via the physical connection to the channel. When true, the device also reports open and short conditions for the channel. Set this property to true for IEPE sensors

N/A

L

Load

MCSA

The motor full load in the unit configured by the Load Unit property according to the motor nameplate

N/A

Load Unit

MCSA

The unit of the motor load from horsepower or kilowatts

N/A

Low Frequency Cutoff

None

The value at or below which InsightCM attenuates frequencies. Attenuation occurs immediately after acquisition and prior to any feature calculations. If you specify a low frequency cutoff value of zero, InsightCM does not attenuate any signal frequencies.

N/A

M

Manufacturer

MCSA

The motor manufacturer according to the motor nameplate

N/A

Model

MCSA

The motor model according to the motor nameplate

N/A

N

Nominal Frequency

MCSA

The nominal frequency of the line power to the motor

N/A

Nominal Line Voltage (volt)

MCSA

The nominal line voltage, in volts, of the voltage bus

N/A

Nominal Speed

None

The theoretical speed if there is no load on the motor

N/A

Number of Intervals

EMSA

The number of sections an EMSA frequency range is divided into

N/A

O

Offset

None

The y-intercept, [b], of the linear scale ( [y] = [mx] + [b] ) applied to pre-scaled data

To disable scaling, enter an offset of 0 and a slope of 1.

P

Pair Sensor

None

The name of another asset to pair with this one for the purpose of generating an orbit plot you can view on the Data Viewer page

N/A

PI Point Name

None

The name of a PI point whose data you want to display on the Data Viewer page. For example, Unit 1_Motor_Accelerometer Vertical_Crest Factor

Refer to the Point Mappings Tab on Historian Page topic for more information about PI point names.

Power Factor

MCSA

The motor power factor at full load according to the motor nameplate

N/A

Probe Angle

None

The angle in degrees at which the sensor is positioned around the shaft

The following image shows the driver-to-driven perspective of a shaft with two sensors attached. For the sensor that is angled to the right on the shaft, the probe angle is between 0 and 180 degrees. For the sensor that is angled to the left, the probe angle is between 0 and -180 degrees.

noloc_eps_probe_angle.png

Note

Probe angles are independent of the shaft rotation direction.

Pulses Per Revolution

None

The number of pulses the tachometer generates per revolution of the shaft. Refer to the sensor documentation to determine this value.

N/A

R

R0

None

The sensor resistance in ohms at 0 degrees Celsius

The Callendar-Van Dusen equation requires this value. Refer to the sensor documentation to determine this value.

Rated Volts (volt)

MCSA

Specify the motor rated voltage in volts according to the motor nameplate

N/A

Resistance Configuration

None

The number of wires to use for resistive measurements

N/A

Reverse Polarity

None

Enable this control if the polarity of the sensor is reversely wired

N/A

Rotation Direction

None

The direction the shaft turns, whether counterclockwise or clockwise relative to the 12:00 position when you look down the shaft starting from the motor, from the driver-to-driven perspective

N/A

RTD Configuration

None

The number of wires to use for resistive measurements and the typical sensor resistance:

  • RTD4W:Pt1000—Uses the 4-wire resistance method and a platinum RTD with a typical resistance of 1,000 kΩ 0º C.

  • RTD4W:Pt100—Uses the 4-wire resistance method and a platinum RTD with a typical resistance of 100 kΩ 0º C.

  • RTD3W:Pt1000—Uses the 3-wire resistance method and a platinum RTD with a typical resistance of 1,000 kΩ 0º C.

  • RTD3W:Pt100—Uses the 3-wire resistance method and a platinum RTD with a typical resistance of 100 kΩ 0º C.

N/A

RTD Type

None

The type of RTD connected to the asset

If you select custom, you must use the three Custom Coefficient properties to supply the coefficients for the Callendar-Van Dusen equation.

S

Sensitivity (mV/EU)

None

The sensitivity value, in millivolts per engineering unit, taken from the documentation for the connected sensor

N/A

Sensor Ratio

MCSA

The ratio of the sensor converting the raw signal to a lower level signal acquired by C Series voltage or current modules

N/A

Serial Number

MCSA

The motor serial number according to the motor nameplate

N/A

Service Factor

MCSA

The service factor of the motor according to the motor nameplate

N/A

Single Integration Cutoff

None

The frequency, in Hz, at which to set the highpass filter when performing single integration on asset data

N/A

Slope

None

The slope, [m], of the linear scale ( [y] = [mx] + [b] ) applied to pre-scaled data

For example, a module might acquire data in volts, but that module might be used with a temperature sensor that outputs 100 mV for every 1 °C. You can set this property to 0.01 to implement the conversion from V to °C. To disable scaling, enter an offset of 0 and a slope of 1.

Speed Ratio

None

The ratio of the speed reference value to the asset speed

For example, enter a value of 4:10, if the sensor that the asset maps to is located on a part of the equipment that is spinning 2.5 times faster than the speed reference.

Speed Reference

None

An asset referenced by other assets for the purpose of calculating speed values to correlate with measurement data

N/A

Start Frequency (Hz)

EMSA

The frequency at which the HFCT begins a frequency sweep

N/A

Stator Resistance (ohm)

None

The Stator Resistance in ohms

This option is hidden if you enables the Estimate Stator Resistance button. The accuracy of the specified Stator Resistance affects the accuracy of the motor Torque Ripple and Torque Waveform calculation.

Stop Frequency (Hz)

EMSA

The frequency at which the HFCT ends a frequency sweep

N/A

Synchronous Speed (RPM)

MCSA

The synchronous speed in rotations per minute of the motor

N/A

T

Tachometer Hysteresis (volt)

None

An offset from the Tachometer Threshold that the tachometer signal must cross before the device monitoring the tachometer can detect a new pulse

This value is always positive. For instance, if the Tachometer Threshold (volt) is -5 V, the Tachometer Hysteresis (volt) is 1 V, and the Tachometer Slope is "falling", this signal must cross -4 V before the device will detect another pulse.

Tachometer Slope

None

The direction of slopes in the signal, whether rising or falling, that causes the device to measure a pulse when the slopes cross the Tachometer Threshold

N/A

Tachometer Threshold (volt)

None

The unscaled value at which slopes in the signal of the specified direction cause the device to measure a pulse

As an example, if the Sensitivity property for the tachometer channel is 200 mV/EU and a pulse should be detected at 80 mils, this property should be set to 16 V. Tachometer Threshold (volt) = Sensitivity * Tachometer Threshold (scaled).

Note

For more information about tachometer-related properties, refer to the Illustration of Tachometer Properties at the bottom of this topic.

Thermocouple Type

None

The type of thermocouple connected to the asset

Thermocouple types, named with letters, differ in composition and measurement range.

Terminal Configuration

None

  • RSE—Specifies that the analog input assets are referenced single-ended (RSE). A referenced single-ended (RSE) measurement system measures voltage with respect to the ground, which is directly connected to the measurement system ground.

  • NRSE—Specifies that the analog input assets are non-referenced single-ended (NRSE). In an NRSE measurements system, all measurements are still made with respect to a single-node analog input, AISENSE, but the potential at this node can vary with respect to the measurement system ground.

  • Differential—Specifies that the analog input assets are differential. A differential measurement system has neither of its inputs tied to a fixed reference, such as earth or building ground. A differential measurement system is similar to a floating signal source in that the measurement is made with respect to a floating ground that is different from the measurement system ground. Handheld, battery-powered instruments and DAQ devices with instrumentation amplifiers are examples of differential measurement systems. This mode measures potential between two inputs and therefore reduces asset count by 2.

N/A

U

Unit

None

The units in which to measure sensor data on the asset it monitors. For MCSA devices, the units of voltage and current channels match the units of the Voltage and Current asset types on the Units tab of the System page. The default unit for voltage channels is volts, and the default unit for current channels is amperes.

The units in which to measure sensor data on the asset it monitors. NA

V

Vertical Bearing Clearance

None

The vertical diameter of the maximum bearing clearance, expressed in the units the Bearing Clearance Unit property specifies

The Data Viewer page uses this value to display the maximum bearing clearance line in orbit and Shaft Centerline viewers.

Voltage Bus

None

The asset name of the voltage bus to which the motor is connected

N/A

Voltage Phase A

MCSA

The potential transformer asset corresponding to phase A of the voltage bus voltage sensors

When you only configure two of the three phase sensors on the Properties tab, InsightCM calculates the data of the third phase sensor.

Voltage Phase B

MCSA

The potential transformer asset corresponding to phase B of the voltage bus voltage sensors

N/A

Voltage Phase C

MCSA

The potential transformer asset corresponding to phase C of the voltage bus voltage sensors

N/A

W

Wiring Configuration

MCSA

The connection type of the voltage bus sensors

N/A

Illustration of Tachometer Properties

In the following illustration, the Tachometer Slope property is set as Falling.

loc_eps_tach_props.gif

In this example, the signal demonstrates the following behavior.

  • The device measures a pulse when the raw voltage signal first falls below the value of the Tachometer Threshold property, as shown in the graph.

  • The signal immediately rises above and then falls below the threshold when the keyway slot passes the proximity probe. However, the device does not measure a second pulse because the signal does not also rise above the hysteresis level.

    Note

    The hysteresis is useful in this situation because it prevents the noisy signal from triggering a second pulse when it falls below the Tachometer Threshold a second time.

  • The signal rises above both the threshold and hysteresis levels, which means the device is able to measure a pulse again when the signal falls below the threshold a third time, near the end of the graph.

equipment assets

Adding Cutsforth Monitoring Devices

Set up monitoring devices in InsightCM to which the hardware maps.

Before you begin, work with your IT department to retrieve the correct IP addresses for each monitoring device.

Select the type of monitoring devices you are adding to InsightCM and complete the corresponding tasks for each device type below.

Adding Continuous Devices

Add a Cutsforth monitoring device that is wired to sensors, the network, and a power source on InsightCM.

Adding Wireless Devices

Add a device that communicates wirelessly with endpoints on InsightCM.

Adding Thermal Imaging Devices

Add a thermal imaging device on InsightCM.

Now that you have added your Cutsforth monitoring devices, begin customizing your condition monitoring system.

Continuous Devices

Familiarize yourself with the following concepts to help you work with Cutsforth monitoring devices that are wired to sensors, the network, and a power source.

For more information regarding module types and compatibility, refer to Continuous Monitoring Device Hardware for InsightCM.

Device Models

Cutsforth Monitoring Devices are available in the following models:

  • High-Performance Condition Monitoring Systems—Supports periodic and continuous file collection when equipment enters an operating state of interest, such as a run-up or coast-down. The CMS-9036 is an example of a Transient, Periodic, and Event Recorder system.

  • General Purpose Monitoring Systems—Supports periodic file collection when triggered by time or data triggers. The CMS-9065 and CMS-9068 are examples of Periodic and Event Recorder systems.

Device Types

When you add a new device, InsightCM requires you to specify the device type. The device type describes the CompactRIO controller and the software application on the device. For example, the CMS-9068 is based on the cRIO-9068 and runs an application designed for monitoring systems.

Each device model has one or more device types that it supports. For example, High Performance Condition Monitoring Systems include device types based on the cRIO-9047 and the cRIO-9036; General Purpose Monitoring Systems include device types based on the cRIO-9068, cRIO-9065, cRIO-9055, and cRIO-9058. Each device runs a different application.

The device type also determines which arrangements of I/O modules within the device chassis are supported.

Device Types for High-Performance Condition Monitoring Systems

The application for High-Performance Condition Monitoring device types supports up to eight dynamic C Series I/O modules, such as the Cutsforth 9232. You must fill module slots in ascending order starting with slot 1. You must fill slots 1 and 2. You cannot skip any slots, but you do not have to use every slot.

These device types come in two formats: one that powers IEPE sensors via the physical connection to the channel and one that does not.

Device Types for General Purpose Monitoring Systems

InsightCM supports a set of arrangements for static and/or dynamic C Series I/O modules in the chassis. The following table lists the module types you can install under each arrangement, but does not represent all possible valid configurations.

Note

You do not need to fill every slot, but you must fill slots in ascending order starting at slot 1.

CMS-9068

Chassis Slot Number

Supported Module Arrangements in CMS-9068

1

Static

Dynamic

Dynamic

Dynamic

2

Static

Dynamic

Dynamic

Dynamic

3

Static

Static

Dynamic

Dynamic

4

Static

Static

Dynamic

Dynamic

5

Static

Static

Dynamic

Dynamic

6

Static

Static

Dynamic

Dynamic

7

Static

Static

Static

Dynamic

8

Static

Static

Static

Dynamic

Chassis Slot Number

Supported Module Arrangements in CMS-9065

1

Static

Dynamic

Dynamic

2

Static

Dynamic

Dynamic

3

Static

Static

Dynamic

4

Static

Static

Dynamic

Guidelines for Chassis with Dynamic Modules

If the arrangement you choose contains any dynamic modules, such as the Cutsforth 9232, install dynamic input modules in adjacent slots beginning with slot 1. You must fill slot 1, but you do not need to fill every slot in the chassis.

Guidelines for Chassis with Only Static Modules

For a list of I/O modules that Cutsforth Monitoring Devices support, contact Cutsforth customer support.

Types of Software for Devices

Firmware

Cutsforth Monitoring Devices run preinstalled firmware, the permanent software on the device that performs lower-level operations than the device application. You do not directly interact with firmware unless you receive an updated or patched version. Use the Package Management page to upload the firmware so you can apply it to devices. Then, use the Software tab on the Device Configuration page to update the firmware on a device to the new version.

Applications for Devices

The Software tab on the Device Configuration page displays an overview of the application types and versions running on each device. Update device applications to the latest version and reset the firmware to the preinstalled version from the Software tab. You do not directly interact with the application unless you receive an updated or patched version. Use the Package Management page to upload the application so you can apply it to devices. The Package Management page refers to applications as system images.

Device Configurations

A device configuration is a collection of properties that controls how a device operates, including how and when it acquires data and collects files. Define the configuration for a device on its Device Configuration page in InsightCM.

Click Update Configuration at the top of the Device Configuration page each time you make a change to a device's configuration to send the updated configuration to the device. The device might require several minutes after the last time you click Save to download the configuration and come online again.

device configuration

Adding a Continuous Device

Add and configure a Cutsforth monitoring device that is wired to sensors, the network, and a power source.

Before you begin, configure assets on the Asset Configuration page.

  1. Click the Configuration pull-down (noloc_env_config.png) and select Devices.

  2. Click Add.

  3. In the New Device dialog box, connect to an online or offline device.

    Option

    Description

    Connect to an online device

    1. Select Connect to an online device and enter the IP address in the textbox.

      Note

      If you do not know the device IP address, click Browse to see a list of devices on the same subnet as the server machine.

    2. To check for common problems that prevent a device from connecting to InsightCM and coming online, click the Connect button. The web application opens the Test Connection dialog box and checks for problems. If the check fails, this dialog box provides troubleshooting information.

      Note

      You can continue to add an online device without resolving failed checks if the device passes the IP address check.

    3. Click OK.

    4. Select your device type from the Device Type pull-down menu.

    5. Configure the slots to match the module configuration on your physical device.

      Note

      If you need to update the module configuration in InsightCM at a later time, navigate to the Hardware tab of the specific device's configuration page.

    6. Click Next.

    7. Enter the following names for the device.

      • Device Name—The name you want to appear throughout the web application. Assign an easily identifiable name, such as one that indicates the physical device location or the equipment it monitors.

      • Hardware Name—The hostname of the device, which is in the format of NI-cRIO-ModelNumber-SerialNumber by default. If the device is online, InsightCM automatically populates this name. Otherwise, find the two values printed on a label on the back of the device.

    Connect to an offline device

    1. Select Create an offline device option and click Next.

    2. Select your device type from the Device Type pull-down menu.

    3. Configure the slots to match the module configuration on your physical device.

      Note

      If you need to update the module configuration in the web application at a later time, navigate to the Hardware tab of the specific device's configuration page.

    4. Click Next.

    5. Enter a descriptive name in the Device Name text field.

    6. Once you have added an offline device, transfer a connection file to your offline device.

  4. Click Finish to add your device to the server.

Now that you have added continuous monitoring devices, map device channels and data groups.

Mapping Channels and Data Groups

Map sensors to device channels and group all sensors for an equipment asset into a data group. You can configure data collection behaviors for each data group.

Ensure that you have added at least one equipment asset with sensor assets on the Asset Configuration page.

Data groups enable you to organize data from device channels monitoring the same equipment into one data event. Since each equipment asset has a defined set of operating states, create one data group per equipment asset.

  1. Click the Configuration pull down (noloc_env_config.png) and select Devices.

  2. Double-click the device whose channels you want to map.

    Note

    For wireless and thermal imaging devices, add wireless sensor endpoints and/or discover ROI cameras directly from the device's configuration page to enable devices to collect data.

  3. Select the Equipment Mapping tab and click Add/Remove.

  4. Click Add, select the equipment level asset, and click OK.

    Note

    If you remove the Default data group from this section, your device channels will automatically be reassigned to the data group you added.

    You created a new data group.

  5. Click the Channels tab and select one of the channels.

  6. Click Select Data Group and select the new data group from the pull-down.

  7. Once you assign the data group to your channels, select a channel and select a sensor in the right-hand asset tree to map a channel to a sensor asset.

    loc_env_device_channels_tab.png
  8. Repeat steps 4–5 until you have mapped each of the sensors to a channel.

    Note

    Not all device channels need to have a sensor mapped to them.

  9. Add additional data groups to the device if you are mapping remaining channels to sensor assets associated with different equipment.

  10. Above the Equipment Mapping tab, click Validate.

    Note

    InsightCM removes unmapped channels when you click Validate. Use the Channels tab to add channels back to the Channels table as needed.

  11. Above the device's configuration tabs, click Back to Devices.

  12. Select the device whose channels you configured and click Update Configuration under the Devices tab.

    Note

    Any changes you make on the Device Configuration page or the Asset Configuration page will not be applied until you click Update Configuration.

Verifying Device Connectivity

After you send the connection information to the device, it automatically connects to the server.

Complete the following steps to verify that the device connects successfully.

  1. In the web application, click the Configuration pull-down (noloc_env_config.png) and select Devices.

    Device Configuration Page.png
  2. On the Devices tab, verify that the Connection Status column for the device says Online, which means the device finished updated and connected successfully to the server.

    Note

    The device might require several minutes to download configuration files and reboot before it connects to the server and comes online. During this time, the device status might change multiple times. Click the Refresh button to see the latest status.

Transferring a Connection File to an Offline Device

Connect your offline device to the InsightCM Server by transferring a connection file to the device.

If you added the device configuration without entering the IP address, the device cannot yet connect to InsightCM because it does not have the information needed to connect to the server. Complete the following steps to transfer credentials to the device.

  1. Click the Configuration pull-down (noloc_env_config.png) and select Devices.

  2. Find the device connection file you exported when you added a device to the InsightCM Server.

  3. If you did not export a connection file, return to the Device Configuration page.

    1. Select the device.

    2. Select the Action menu (noloc_env_action.png) and hover over Connection.

    3. Select Export Connection File.

  4. Copy the file to a USB drive folder named upload in the following directory: <RootLevel>:\InsightCM.

    Note

    If the upload folder does not exist, create it.

    Note

    The filename must be in the format of DeviceHostname-SerialNumber.json or the device will not read it.

  5. Insert the USB into the USB port on the controller front panel and note that the USER1 LED light will switch from blinking to solid when the device is reading the connection file.

  6. When the USER1 LED returns to blinking steadily, remove the USB drive.

  7. From the Device Configuration page, select the device to which you manually transferred a connection file, click the Action menu (noloc_env_action.png) and select Reboot.

Acquiring Data

When the device is online with all relevant channels mapped to sensors, test your device's ability to acquire data. Automatic acquisitions occur periodically, but you can force an acquisition at any time using Force Trigger.

Complete the following steps to test whether or not the channels in your device can acquire data.

  1. Click the Configuration pull-down (noloc_env_config.png) and select Devices.

  2. On the Devices tab, select the device you added.

  3. In the Action (noloc_env_action.png) menu, select Force Trigger to perform an acquisition from all channels.

  4. Click the Layout (noloc_env_layout.png) button on the viewer toolbar, hover over Chart Type, and select Thermal Image to change the viewer to one that can view thermal imaging data.

  5. Wait several seconds for the acquisition to be complete before clicking the Data Viewer (noloc_env_dataviewer.png) button to view the Data Viewer page. Click on a feature level asset for the equipment and confirm that data has been acquired.

    Note

    Before data is available, devices must finish performing the acquisition and the InsightCM server must receive and store the data. The duration of a force-triggered acquisition is based on the file length of the equipment's Default operating state.

    For a complete list of ways you can configure a device to perform acquisitions, refer to Methods for Initiating Device Acquisitions.

  6. Repeat the force acquisition several times to acquire multiple data sets.

device configuration

Wireless Gateways and Devices

Wireless gateways, wireless monitoring devices, and wireless vibration sensors eliminate the need for extensive wiring by using wireless technology to transmit equipment data to the InsightCM server for analysis while maintaining high levels of data acquisition.

Wireless Monitoring Gateways

A MON-10496 is a wireless gateway device that sends data to the server and receives data from endpoints. Endpoints are wireless devices and wireless sensors that communicate data to the MON-10496.

Note

Environmental factors—such as physical obstruction and severe weather—can affect the performance of the wireless gateway and wireless monitoring device. Configurable factors—such as frequency and size of data collections—can also affect the performance of the wireless monitoring gateway, the wireless device, and the wireless sensor.

The endpoint is configured from the MON-10496's Device Configuration page and is added with an association to an equipment asset.

MON-10496Endpoints

Wireless Vibration Measurement Devices

A MON-10467 is a wireless vibration measurement device that sends data wirelessly to the MON-10496 and can be configured with the following sensors:

  • Accelerometer

  • Displacement

  • Tachometer

  • Velocity

  • Static voltage

MON-10467

Wireless Vibration Sensors

A MON-10411 is a wireless vibration sensor that sends data wirelessly to the MON-10496 and has the following built-in sensors:

  • Three Accelerometers

  • Wireless Temperature

MON-10411

Adding Wireless Monitoring Devices and Endpoints

Add a wireless monitoring device and an endpoint to the InsightCM server.

  1. Click the Configuration pull-down (noloc_env_config.png) and select Devices.

  2. Click the Add button.

  3. In the New Device dialog box, you can add a device in two ways.

    Option

    Description

    Connect to an online device

    1. If you do not know the IP address of your device but it is online, select Connect to an online device and click Browse to see a list of devices on the same subnet as the server machine.

    2. Select a device from the Subnet Devices dialog box and click OK.

    3. Click Connect and the web application will automatically perform tests to verify the device IP address, firmware, connection, and hardware.

      Note

      • In the Testing Connection dialog box, you can see the results of testing and information about how to resolve any issues.

      • You can continue to add an online device without resolving failed checks if the device passes the IP address check.

    4. Click OK.

    5. Select the wireless device type from the Device Type pull-down.

    6. Configure the slots as needed to match the module configuration on your physical device.

    7. Click Next.

    8. Give the device a descriptive name in the Device Name text field.

    Connect to an offline device

    1. If your device is offline, ensure that the Connect to an offline device option is selected and click Next.

    2. Select your device type from the Device Type pull-down.

    3. Configure the slots as needed to match the module configuration on your physical device.

      Note

      If you need to update the module configuration in the web application at a later time, navigate to the Hardware tab of the specific device's configuration page.

    4. Click Next.

    5. Give the device a descriptive name in the Device Name text field.

    6. Once you have added an offline device, transfer a connection file to your offline device.

  4. Click OK and you will be automatically redirected to the Endpoints tab of the wireless monitoring device's configuration page.

  5. Click Add pull-down menu and select Offline to add the endpoint as an offline device.

    Note

    If the endpoint is powered and within range of the wireless monitoring device, click Add to have your wireless monitoring device discover the endpoint.

  6. Enter the serial number of your endpoint, designate the endpoint type as Wireless Sensor for a MON-10411 or Wireless Device for a MON-10467, and click OK.

  7. In the Select Wireless Equipment dialog box, select a wireless equipment asset to associate the wireless device endpoint with and click OK to add your endpoint.

    Note

    To change the asset endpoint associates with, be sure to remove the endpoint from its current asset before adding it to the new one.

  8. Use the pull-down under Channel in the Endpoint configuration panel to assign which channels from the wireless gateway correspond to each sensor associated with the equipment.

    Note

    If you have added more than one endpoint, you may need to resolve the collection time schedule by clicking Schedule and then Resolve All. If you do not resolve the collection time, wireless endpoints will spend additional time communicating with the gateway, which decreases endpoint battery life.

Now you have successfully added a wireless monitoring device and an endpoint to your InsightCM server. Wireless devices default to having one collection time. You can reconfigure collection time in the Collection tab of the wireless equipment's configuration panel.

Acquiring Data for Wireless Devices

When the wireless gateway is online with all endpoints mapped to sensor assets, you can test your wireless device's ability to acquire data. Automatic acquisitions occur periodically, but you can force an acquisition at any time by using Force Trigger.

Complete the following steps to acquire data from one of your endpoints.

Note

Acquiring data from all of a device's endpoints can create network congestion.

  1. Click the Data Viewer (noloc_env_dataviewer.png) button.

  2. Expand one of the wirelessly monitored equipment assets, select a sensor asset, and then select one of the features. By selecting a feature, you activate the Trend viewer chart.

  3. In the Trend viewer chart, click the Action menu (noloc_env_action.png) and select Force Trigger to acquire data from the endpoint mapped to this equipment asset.

  4. Wait several seconds for the acquisition to complete and click the Refresh button to confirm that your device received new data points.

    Note

    If you force an acquisition for all endpoints, it could take several minutes for the wireless gateway to complete the acquisition.

  5. Repeat the force acquisition several times to acquire multiple data sets.

  6. Select a feature level asset for a different equipment asset to confirm in the Trend viewer chart not yet populated with new data.

    Note

    Before the data is available, devices must finish performing the acquisition and the InsightCM server must receive and store the data. You can change the duration of force-triggered acquisitions on the Operating States tab for the equipment being monitored on the Asset Configuration page.

For a complete list of ways you can configure a device to perform acquisitions, refer to Methods for Initiating Device Acquisitions.

MON-10496EndpointsMON-10467MON-10411

Thermal Imaging Device Types

Using thermal cameras, monitor thermal data in a large area without extensive wiring to thermocouples.

Device Type

Compatible Camera(s)

Sensor Asset Type

Description

IR-31201

FLIR A35, FLIR A65

Delta, ROI

Supports up to two thermal cameras. See the IC-3120 help for more information.

IR-90552

Xi410

Delta, ROI

Supports up to ten thermal cameras. See the cRIO-9055 help for more information.

1Connects directly to the device controller by ethernet connection, not by channels on a module.

2Connects to the device through a Power over Ethernet (PoE) adapter, not by channels on a module.

Adding a Thermal Imaging Device

Add a thermal imaging device to collect temperature data from thermal cameras.

  1. Click Configuration (noloc_env_config.png) and select Devices.

  2. In the Devices tab, click Add.

  3. Select Connect to an online device and enter the IP address in the textbox.

    Note

    If you do not know the device IP address, click Browse to see a list of devices on the same subnet as the server machine.

  4. Click the Connect button. The Test Connection dialog box prompts you if the device fails to connect to the server machine and come online. Resolve all failures before continuing.

  5. Click Next.

  6. If the device passes all connection tests, the web application detects and displays the controller. Click Next.

  7. Enter the two types of names for the device.

    1. Device Name—The name that will appear throughout the web application.

      Note

      Assign your device an easily identifiable name, such as one that includes the device location.

    2. Hardware Name—The hostname of the device, which is in the format of NI-IC-ModelNumber-SerialNumber by default. If the device is online, the server automatically populates this name. Otherwise, you can find the two values printed on a label on the back of the device.

  8. Click Finish.

  9. When the web application prompts you to send the connection information to the device web server, click Yes.

Discover your FLIR or Optris cameras.

Discovering FLIR Cameras

Discover and add the FLIR A35 and/or FLIR A65 cameras you will use to monitor your equipment's thermal data.

Ensure that you have completed the steps in Adding a Thermal Imaging Device and that you have the serial number for each camera you intend to add.

  1. Click Configuration (noloc_env_config.png) and select Devices.

  2. On the Devices tab, double-click the device to which the camera(s) connect.

    Note

    Cameras are connected and also powered through their connection to the device.

  3. On the Cameras tab, click Add.

  4. In the Add Cameras dialog box, click Discover and the serial numbers of all valid cameras connected to the device appear in the table.

  5. Select the cameras you want to add and click Apply.

  6. When prompted, enter a descriptive name for each camera and click OK.

    Note

    Allow several minutes after you add a thermal imaging device before attempting to discover cameras.

Add regions of interest and configure temperature deltas.

Preparing Optris Cameras for Discovery

Set up the Xi410 Optris cameras you will use to monitor your equipment's thermal data before you add and configure them on InsightCM.

Before you begin, ensure the computer you use for the initial camera setup is compatible with PIX Connect software and you can change the network settings securely.

  1. Install and launch the latest version of PIX Connect software as an administrator.

  2. Connect the Xi410 camera to the computer using the provided USB cable.

    Note

    Cutsforth recommends setting up one camera at a time.

  3. Click Devices and verify that PIX Connect recognizes the camera.

    pxc-devices-camera.png
  4. Click Help > About and verify that the Imager Firmware version on the camera is at least 3814 or newer.

    Imager Firmware version is older than 3814

    1. Click ToolsExtendedUpdate Firmware.

    2. Deploy the latest firmware to the camera from PIX Connect.

    3. Click HelpAbout to confirm the firmware update.

    4. Click Close.

    Imager Firmware version is 3814 or newer

    Click Close.

  5. Click Devices > Ethernet Settings.

  6. Set Device Address to 192.168.0.101.

    Note

    If multiple Optris cameras will be connected to the same thermal imaging device, increment the last digit of the IP address for each successive camera.

  7. Set Send to address to 192.168.0.100.

  8. Set Subnet Mask to 255.255.255.0.

  9. Set Port to 50000.

    Note

    If multiple Optris cameras will be connected to the same thermal imaging device, increment the final digit of the port number for each successive camera.

  10. Disable the Auto assign port number checkbox to better track what data is coming from which camera.

  11. Set Listen on port number to 50000 (or—if another camera—to the same port number you assigned to this camera).

  12. Click OK.

  13. Click Tools > Configuration.

  14. On the Device tab, input a Temperature Range.

  15. On the External Communication tab, select the Enable checkbox under Direct temperature mode.

    Note

    Temperature values will not be correct unless you enable this checkbox.

  16. Click OK.

  17. Click Devices > Set configuration to device to push your configuration settings to the camera. Once the progress bar at the bottom of the window is complete, you have successfully configured your Optris camera.

  18. Disconnect and set aside the USB cable.

  19. Connect the camera to the Power over Ethernet (PoE) adapter.

  20. Using an ethernet cable, connect the PoE adapter to the PoE Switch.

  21. Using another ethernet cable, connect the PoE Switch to the computer.

  22. On the computer, navigate to View network computers and devices in File Explorer.

  23. Select Network and Sharing Center.

  24. Click Change adaptor options.

  25. Set up your ethernet port for a connection test with the Optris camera.

    1. Select the Ethernet port that is connected to your Optris camera and click Change settings of this connection > Properties.

    2. Select Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4) > Properties.

    3. Select Use the following IP address.

      Note

      After you successfully test the camera ethernet connection, revert this setting so that your ethernet port resumes obtaining IP addresses automatically.

    4. Set IP address to 192.168.0.100.

    5. Set Subnet mask to 255.255.255.0.

  26. Test the ethernet connection to the Optris camera.

    1. Launch PIX Connect.

    2. Click Devices and select the Optris camera you want to test.

    3. Select the Connect checkbox and verify that the UDP Port number is 50000.

      Note

      If you change the port number between when you configured it during initial camera setup, you have to re-enter the correct port number each time you launch the software.

      As a result, your operating system firewall may request permission to communicate.

    4. Select Private networks and Public networks and click Allow access.

      Note

      If you are unable to see an image from the camera, you may need to disable the Windows Firewall until you complete this test. If you disable the Windows Firewall, ensure that your computer is not connected to an open network while the firewall is disabled.

    5. Confirm that the direct temperature mode checkbox is enabled.

    6. Click Tools > Configuration > External Communication.

    7. Confirm that a live image from the camera shows on the computer and that the Connected to IP address matches the one you set for the Optris camera during setup.

      Note

      The corners of the live image should say Temperature Mode.

  27. Close PIX Connect and disconnect the PoE switch from the computer.

  28. Using an ethernet cable, connect the PoE Switch to the secondary ethernet port on the IR-9055.

Configure your thermal imaging device and sensors in InsightCM.

Discovering Optris Cameras

Discover and configure the Xi410 Optris cameras on InsightCM.

Before you begin, complete the set-up process for the Optris cameras and add a thermal imaging device. Have your camera IP address(es) and port number(s) ready.

  1. Click Configuration (noloc_env_config.png) and select Devices.

  2. On the Devices tab, double-click the device to which the camera(s) connect.

    Note

    The camera's device connection both powers the device and carries the signal.

  3. On the Cameras tab, click Add.

  4. In the Add Cameras dialog box, click Discover and the IP addresses and port numbers of all valid cameras connected to the device appear in the table.

  5. Select the cameras you want to add and click Apply.

  6. When prompted, enter a descriptive name for each camera and click OK.

    Note

    Allow several minutes after you add a thermal imaging device before attempting to discover cameras.

Add regions of interest configure temperature deltas

Adding and Mapping Regions of Interest

Define the section of a camera image that you want to monitor for thermal data.

Complete the following steps to define a Region of Interest (ROI) to monitor using your thermal imaging camera and device.

  1. Click the Configuration pull-down (noloc_env_config.png) and select Devices.

  2. In the list of devices on the Devices tab, double-click the device connected to the camera for which you want to define an ROI.

  3. On the Cameras tab, select the camera that monitors the equipment for thermal data and click Manage ROIs.

  4. In the [Camera Name] ROIs dialog box, click Add.

  5. In the New ROI dialog box, select the piece of equipment the camera is monitoring.

  6. In the box at the bottom of the New ROI dialog box, enter a descriptive name for the ROI and click OK.

  7. In the ROIs dialog box, click the Capture Image button.

    Note

    If you added your camera as an offline device, but captured an image that you took from the device prior to connecting it to InsightCM, you may upload it as a JSON file and identify ROIs using the uploaded image.

  8. Use the Rectangle ROI or Polygon ROI button to draw an ROI on the captured image.

    Note

    You can use the arrow buttons along the side of the image to nudge the ROI if the position of the camera shifts.

  9. Without capturing a new image each time, repeat Steps 2–7 until you have added all your ROIs.

  10. Click Close when you are finished adding ROIs.

Configuring Temperature Deltas

Deltas measure the difference between two ROIs that have the largest temperature difference in a group of two or more ROIs. The delta is calculated by subtracting the lowest maximum temperature from the highest maximum temperature of a set of ROIs selected. You can set alarm conditions on deltas to monitor when the difference between ROI temperatures exceeds the value you specify.

Complete the following steps to configure an ROI Delta.

  1. Click the Configuration (noloc_env_config.png) button and ensure that you are on the Asset Configuration page.

  2. In the asset tree, select the piece of equipment that contains the ROIs for which you want to configure a delta.

  3. Click Add and select Sensors » Thermal Imaging » Delta in the New Asset dialog box.

  4. Enter a descriptive name for the delta and click OK.

  5. On the Properties tab for the new ROI delta, click the Edit button next to the Camera field.

  6. In the Camera dialog box, select the camera containing the ROIs you want to configure a delta for, click OK and a new row for ROIs should appear.

  7. Click the pull-down next to the ROIs field and select the ROIs you want the delta to compare. Your changes will be saved automatically.

You can monitor delta values using the thermal imaging viewer on the Data Viewer page after you send the connection information to the device.

Configuring a Data Group

Create and configure data groups to group data from channels mapped to sensors that monitor the same piece of equipment into one data event.

For more information on data groups, refer to the Data Groups topic. If you are seeking to add endpoints on a wireless device, refer to the Adding Wireless Gateways and Endpoints topic.

  1. Click the Configuration pull-down (noloc_env_config.png) and select Devices.

  2. Double-click a device to navigate to the device's configuration page.

  3. In the Equipment Mapping tab, click the Add/Remove button and then click Add to display the Select Location dialog box.

  4. Select the top-level asset for the data group. This will likely be an equipment asset.

  5. Click Select, then OK.

  6. Select a channel in the Channels section and click Select Data Group.

  7. In the Select Data Group dialog box, select the data group you just created in the Data Group listbox.

    loc_env_datagroupmap.png
  8. Click OK to assign the channel to that data group.

To learn how to map channels on your device to sensor-level assets in your data group, refer to the Mapping Device Channels and Data Groups topic.

Data Groups

Learn what data groups are and when they may be useful.

When you configure a device in InsightCM, you assign the device channels to one or more data groups. A data group is a set of channels mapped to sensors that monitor the same piece of equipment. Data groups are useful in situations where a single device monitors more than one piece of equipment.

Assigning the channels monitoring each piece of equipment to different data groups allows you to configure unique behavior for each group of channels even if all of the channels belong to the same device.

noloc_eps_datagroup_case.png
data group
data group
device configurationMON-10496EndpointsMON-10467MON-10411data group

Finding or Setting a Device IP Address

Locate or add the IP address of a device to add it to the server.

Before you begin, power on your Cutsforth monitoring device and connect a removable drive. Use either a type C drive or a type A drive with a type C converter. If you are using an encrypted USB flash drive, make sure that it is formatted to use the FAT32 file system.

Once you have mounted your Cutsforth monitoring device, either find and use the device's IP address or set the IP address to one you receive from your IT department. In either case, save a copy of and update several fields in the device's networkInfo.json file.

The following table shows all supported values for the IP Address Request Mode field:

Value

IP Address Type

1

Static

2

DHCP or Link Local

3

Link Local Only

4

DHCP Only

  1. Insert the USB drive into the USB port on the controller front panel.

    When the USER1 LED light is solid, it indicates that the device is reading from or writing to the settings file.

  2. Remove the USB drive when the USER1 LED starts blinking again.

  3. Insert the USB drive into a USB port on a computer.

  4. Navigate to the following directory on the USB drive:

    <RootLevel>:\InsightCM\download\NI-cRIO-ModelNumber-SerialNumber
  5. Create an upload folder in the InsightCM folder if one does not already exist.

  6. Save a copy of the networkInfo_<device hostname>.json to the following location on the USB drive:

    <RootLevel>:\InsightCM\upload

    Note

    If you save the file in another location, the device will not read it.

  7. Open networkInfo_<device hostname>.json.

  8. Locate the IP address within the object that contains "IsPrimary":"true".

    The following name/value pair defines the IP address:

    IPAddr:x.x.x.x
  9. Enter a new value in the IP address field for the primary object.

    Note

    If using dynamic host configuration protocol (DHCP), record the IP address. However, Cutsforth recommends using static addresses.

  10. To assign a static IP address, change the IP Address Request Mode value to 1.

  11. Enter new values in the Subnet Mask and Gateway fields in the primary object according to the information you receive from your IT department.

  12. Save and close the file.

  13. If you made changes to the file, complete the following steps to apply your changes to the device:

    1. Insert the USB drive back into the USB port on the controller front panel.

      When the USER1 LED light is solid, it indicates that the device is reading network and connection properties.

    2. You can remove the USB drive when the USER1 LED returns to blink steadily.

    3. Reinsert the USB drive into a computer and browse to <RootLevel>:\InsightCM.

    4. Verify the applied folder contains networkInfo_<device hostname>.json.

Configuring Hysteresis

Permission-Based Access to the Web Application

The server implements authentication for users by providing permissions to groups of users. Permissions serve as access rights that control the ability of the users to view or make changes to specific pages in the web application. Therefore, you might not see pages, tabs, or components described in this help system, or you might not be able to edit particular settings. When possible, this help system documents the permissions required to perform actions so you can seek assistance from a user who possesses the required permissions.

equipment assetsdevice configurationMON-10496EndpointsMON-10467MON-10411data group
Was this article helpful?
0 out of 0 found this helpful